The Perfect Word

Catherine Drinker Bowen won the National Book Award for Nonfiction in 1958. I’d say she found the right words. πŸ™‚

Unable to find the right word can be frustrating. The more we write (and read), the better chance we have of finding the perfect word. Happy writing, friends!

How do you feel when you find the perfect word?

Image by DarkWorkX from Pixabay

Unable to find the right word can be frustrating. The more we write (and read), the better chance we have of finding the perfect word. #writetip #amwriting @GailJohnson87

16 thoughts on “The Perfect Word

  1. Great point, Gail! My personal habit is reading older books, like those from a hundred years ago. I find a treasure trove of words that are not in normal use, like “sward” (a patch of short grass) and “rick” (a thatched haystack–that one from George Elliot’s The Mill on the Floss). Like Shauna, I often struggle to remember even ordinary words, and keeping my own dictionary of words I like really helps. Thanks for your post.

    • Hi, DT. I love the word sward! I also collect words and try to use them when I can. It’s interesting to see how the English language has changed over the years. Thanks for reading and commenting. πŸ™‚

  2. Life’s experiences in the past two years have left me searching for the right words. So I read more than I write. My passion for writing pretty well disappeared.

    • Hi, Shauna. I understand that. I felt that way last year. Give yourself time. Enjoy your reading journey. I promise the desire to create will return. Maybe in a new way! Thanks for dropping by.

  3. I’ve always liked Mark Twain’s quote: “The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”

    • Yes. Frustrating is the perfect word. I’m not sure we ever finish looking for the right words. LOL! Our hunt begins with the next sentence, paragraph, and story. Happy hunting. Thanks for sharing your thoughts.

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